Privacy and Access 20/20 Conference The Future of Privacy Nov 12 -13, 2015, Vancouver, BC

General Information

The Information and Privacy Commissioner for British Columbia and Reboot Communications are pleased to announce the 2nd Privacy and Access 20/20 Conference, November 12 and 13, 2015 at the Coast Coal Harbour Hotel in Vancouver, BC. The theme for this two-day conference is The Future of Privacy.

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In an age of ubiquitous technology, mass amounts of personal data are being digitized, shared, analyzed and monetized. These tools have broad application and will transform the way we work, the way we are governed, and the way we think about information and data.

This conference will have broad appeal to individuals in the public, private and non-profit sectors. The agenda will offer thought-provoking, intellectual content from experts in industry, government, and civil society. It will showcase B.C. talent, but also include national and international thought leaders.

Our conference agenda will promote engagement and dialogue on issues including:

  • National Security Issues
  • The Connected Car
  • The Right to be Forgotten
  • The Age of Robotics
  • Big Data
  • Cultures of Privacy
  • Wearable Technology
  • Youth Privacy and Cyber Bullying

 

Conference Rates

Early Bird Rate (before Sept.15, 2015) Regular Rate (after Sept.15, 2015)
Public Sector $475.00 CAD (plus GST) $595.00 CAD (plus GST)
Private Sector $475.00 CAD (plus GST) $595.00 CAD (plus GST)

 

Coast Coal Harbour Hotel

Vancouver has a whole lot to offer, and at our Coast Coal Harbour hotel, you’ll be at the perfect location to soak it all in.

The Coast Coal Harbour Hotel is situated right near the water, a stone’s throw from the beautiful Stanley Park as well as the bustling Gastown district and the renowned shopping on Robson St. and within easy access to an incredible array of arts and entertainment. We’re also steps from the Vancouver Convention Centre ideal for our business travelers.

Each of the guest rooms at our  downtown Vancouver hotel features floor-to-ceiling windows and sleek, yet comfortable, décor. Our rooms come with complimentary wireless Internet and a range of modern amenities. You’ll also have access to our top-notch fitness center, pool and hot tub—not to mention our signature Prestons Restaurant, the perfect spot to drink, dine and dish about your Vancouver experience.

Contact Information for the Coast Coal Harbour:

Reservations: 604.697.0202 or 800.716.6199
1180 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC  V6E 4R5

Canada

Keynote Speakers

Dr. Lisa Austin

Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

Cindy Compert

CTO, Data Privacy, IBM Security

Sylvia Kingsmill

National Partner, Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte

Daniel Pradelles

Global Strategic Engagements & External Relations Privacy, Human Rights & SER Office, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise

Daniel Therrien

Privacy Commissioner of Canada

John Weigelt

National Technology Officer, Microsoft Canada

Honourable Clyde Wells

Counsel, Cox & Palmer; Former Premier of Newfoundland & Labrador

Speakers

Martin Abrams

Executive Director and Chief Strategist, Information Accountability Foundation

David Adams

President, Global Automakers of Canada

Steve Anderson

Founder and Executive Director of OpenMedia.ca

Dr. Lisa Austin

Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

Nik Badminton

Futurist

Ian Bailey

Assistant Deputy Minister of Technology Solutions, Ministry of Technology, Innovation and Citizens’ Services, Province of BC

Dr. Colin J. Bennett

Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Victoria

Ryan Berger

Partner, Dispute Resolution, Litigation, Bull, Housser & Tupper LLP

Chantal Bernier

Counsel, Dentons Canada LLP, Former Interim Privacy Commissioner of Canada

Dr. Ryan Calo

Assistant Professor of Law, University of Washington

Kevin Chan

Head of Public Policy, Facebook Canada

David Chapin

Senior Managing Consultant, Global Security Practice, IBM

Jill Clayton

Information and Privacy Commissioner, Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner for Alberta

Sheila Colclasure

Public Policy and Privacy Officer, Acxiom

Cindy Compert

CTO, Data Privacy, IBM Security

Dr. Barry Cooper

Professor, Political Science Department, University of Calgary

Stan Crosley

Director, Indiana University Center for Law, Ethics and Applied Research (CLEAR) in Health Information

Peter Cullen

Executive Strategist for Policy Innovation, The Information Accountability Foundation

Dr. Kate Darling

Research Specialist at the MIT Media Lab, MIT

Susan Delacourt

Journalist, Toronto Star

Elizabeth Denham

Information and Privacy Commissioner for British Columbia

Pam Dixon

Executive Director, World Privacy Forum

Michael Doucet

Executive Director, Security Intelligence Review Committee

Dr. David Flaherty

Former Information and Privacy Commissioner for BC

Vincent Gogolek

Executive Director, BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association

Lynn Goldstein

Foundation Senior Scholar, The Information Accountability Foundation

Dr. Benjamin Goold

Professor, Faculty of Law, University of British Columbia

Aran Hamilton

President and Co-Founder, Vantage Analytics; President, DIACC

Dr. Woodrow Hartzog

Assistant Professor, Cumberland School of Law, Samford University, Affiliate Scholar, The Center for Internet & Society at Stanford Law School

David Hume

Executive Director, Citizen Engagement, Ministry of Advanced Education, Province of BC

Ian Jack

Managing Director of Communications and Government Relations, Canadian Automobile Association (CAA)

John Jacobson

Deputy Minister, Ministry of Technology, Innovation and Citizens’ Services, Province of BC

Joseph Jerome

Policy Counsel, Future of Privacy Forum

Matt Johnson

Director of Education, Media Smarts

Dr. Jeremy Johnson

Data Engineer, Ginger.io

Dr. Ian Kerr

Canada Research Chair in Ethics, Law & Technology, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa

Alexis Kerr

Director, Legal Services, General Legal Counsel, Fraser Health Authority

Sylvia Kingsmill

National Partner, Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte

Darren Laur

Director, Personal Protection Systems Inc.

Philippa Lawson

Former Director, Canadian Internet Policy & Public Interest Clinic

David Loukidelis, QC

Privacy Consultant, former BC Information and Privacy Commissioner

Brendon Lynch

Chief Privacy Officer, Microsoft

Michael McEvoy

Deputy Commissioner, Office of the Information & Privacy Commissioner for BC

Colin McKay

Head of Public Policy & Government Relations, Canada, Google

Nancy Meagher

Executive Director, PopData BC

Dr. Hiroshi Miyashita

Associate Professor of Law, Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo

Dr. Ubaka Ogbogu

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta

Cory Olson

Compliance Director, TELUS Compliance and Privacy Office, TELUS

Dimitri Pantazopoulos

Partner, Maple Leaf Strategies

Daniel Pradelles

Global Strategic Engagements & External Relations Privacy, Human Rights & SER Office, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise

John Russo

Chief Privacy Officer, Equifax

Shelly Smith

Director, TELUS WISE, TELUS

Daniel Therrien

Privacy Commissioner of Canada

Gonzalo Tudela

CEO, Vandrico Solutions Inc

Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond

The Representative for Children and Youth

Micheal Vonn

Policy Director, BC Civil Liberties Association

Wendy Wagner

Partner, Gowlings

John Weigelt

National Technology Officer, Microsoft Canada

Honourable Clyde Wells

Counsel, Cox & Palmer; Former Premier of Newfoundland & Labrador

Nora Young

Host of Spark: 21st Century Life, CBC Radio

Frank Zinatelli

Vice-President & General Counsel, Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association
Print Agenda

*Invited Speaker

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

3:00-5:00 Coal Harbour Ballroom Foyer

Registration

Thursday, November 12, 2015

8:00 Coal Harbour Ballroom Foyer

Registration

8:00 – 8:45 Coal Harbour Ballroom Foyer

Morning Coffee

8:45 – 8:50 Coal Harbour Ballroom

Call to Conference

8:50 – 9:10 Coal Harbour Ballroom

Welcome Remarks

9:10 – 9:55 Coal Harbour Ballroom Presentation Files Daniel Therrien

Keynote Address: National Security and Privacy in 2015

In his remarks, Commissioner Therrien will discuss legislative developments in Canada and around the world in what has been a an eventful year for the intersection of these two indispensable democratic societal values. His presentation will include a discussion of the role of oversight and review mechanisms in ensuring respect for privacy within initiatives to protect public safety.

Presentation Files Daniel Therrien

9:55 – 11:05 Coal Harbour Ballroom

Plenary Panel: Bill C-51, National Security, and Surveillance

The federal government has passed new laws that expand the powers of law enforcement, national security and intelligence agencies, the most notable being Bill C-51, the Anti-Terrorism Act. Significant concerns have been raised about the implications of these laws for the privacy rights of Canadians, yet some say the world is changing and that increased powers are necessary to fight terrorist threats. This panel will explore the different sides of the debate, with an eye to the evolving dialogue between privacy and security as it unfolds in the wake of Bill C-51.

11:05 – 11:25 Coal Harbour Ballroom Foyer

Morning Break

11:25 – 12:40 Coal Harbour A

Concurrent Panel Session A: Managing Digital Identities

This panel will look at how various forms of online identity – ranging from social media profiles to unique online identifiers – have developed in recent years, and the impact these new “digital identities” and “identity tokens” have had on the ways individuals interact with each other, private organizations, and the state. In particular, this panel will consider the extent to which the private sector should be involved in the creation and management of online identities and whether – given how much of our personal and working lives are now lived online – there is a need for greater state involvement in this increasingly important area.

11:25 – 12:40 Coal Harbour B Presentation Files David Adams Ian Black Joseph Jerome Philippa Lawson

Concurrent Panel Session B: The Connected Car

Connected cars, like many "smart devices", connect us to the world around us; at the same time they collect volumes of personal data about drivers, passengers and others on and around our roads. Used properly, such data can deliver personalized, driver-centric experiences. But these tools raise very serious privacy questions, including who controls the data, where is it stored, and the extent to which it is shared with other parties.

Presentation Files David Adams Ian Black Joseph Jerome Philippa Lawson

12:40 – 1:40 Coal Harbour Ballroom

Networking Luncheon - Sponsored by Lawson Lundell, LLP

1:40 – 2:55 Coal Harbour A

Concurrent Panel Session A: Health Data and Mobile

Health data sensors and analytics are a growing share of the wearables market. Done correctly and ethically, these new technologies could solve the most significant health puzzles of our generation. Done poorly and with disregard for privacy and ethics, these new technologies and analytics could create immense harm to individuals and to healthcare and research. This panel will review cutting edge applications and devices involved in collecting and processing data directly from consumers that can be utilized to infer health status, including Proteus' Ingestible Digital Sensor and a mobile application from Ginger.io that analyzes mobile device usage to infer mental health status.

1:40 – 2:55 Coal Harbour B Presentation Files Hiroshi Miyashita Wendy Wagner

Concurrent Panel Session B: The Right to be Forgotten

The global ramifications of the right to be forgotten continue to unfold. In 2014 the European Court of Justice ruled that EU residents can ask search engines such as Google or Bing to de-link results that are out of date, excessive, or not relevant. In July 2015 the French data protection authority ordered Google to implement such requests worldwide and Google has refused. Search engine companies contend that implementing a global right to be forgotten will result in censorship of the Internet. But civil society and privacy regulators continue to advocate for an individual’s right to control their personal information, including through deletion or de-linking. What can regulators, privacy advocates, and Internet companies do to address these issues? What are the challenges? Is there a balance to be found between individuals’ privacy and free expression?

Presentation Files Hiroshi Miyashita Wendy Wagner

2:55 – 3:25 Coal Harbour A Presentation Files John Weigelt

Concurrent Keynote Address: A Frame of Reference for Confidence in the Cloud

While organizational business units and IT operations teams have rapidly adopted a cloud state of mind, they are often a few steps ahead of the teams that help safeguard an organization’s interests. Since security and privacy are characteristics that help organizations do more with technology, it is essential that compliance teams quickly adopt a changed frame of reference for the cloud. John Weigelt, National Technology Office for Microsoft Canada, will explore how cloud changes the traditional frame of reference for establishing assurance from a technical, procedural and contractual perspective.

Presentation Files John Weigelt

2:55 – 3:25 Coal Harbour B Presentation Files Sylvia Kingsmill

Concurrent Keynote Address: Managing Privacy Risk in the Age of the Internet

Now that the privacy regulatory landscape has changed with more stringent obligations, fines and penalties, and with privacy class action law suits on the rise, organizations are trying to navigate through the risk by thinking about privacy from a more proactive, risk-based perspective. Privacy has become a branding issue rather than a mere compliance exercise. We are seeing huge uptake on "privacy by design" approaches to building innovative technologies, like wearables, and IOT platforms. Retailers and banks for example, are thinking of transformative digital strategies to reinvent the customer experience where the path to purchase has changed and triggers a host of new privacy risks and other compliance considerations.

Presentation Files Sylvia Kingsmill

3:25 – 3:45 Coal Harbour Ballroom Foyer

Afternoon Break

3:45 – 5:00 Coal Harbour A Presentation Files Pam Dixon Lynn Goldstein John Russo

Concurrent Panel Session A: The Big Data Debate

Big data has the potential to reveal insights into consumer behavior, improve health outcomes, and our quality of life. There is no question big data, coupled with advanced analytics, can generate value for businesses, consumers and society. But the use of big data also presents big challenges for privacy, including accountability for how the insights gained are ultimately used. This panel is framed as a debate: are privacy laws up to the challenge of big data, yes or no?

Presentation Files Pam Dixon Lynn Goldstein John Russo

3:45 – 5:00 Coal Harbour B

Concurrent Panel Session B: Health Privacy and Genetics

Rapid advances in genetics, coupled with plummeting costs of sequencing technologies, has meant more and more genomic data is becoming accessible. What are the privacy implications of expanded collection and use of genomic data in public and private sector? What legal, ethical and policy solutions do we need to consider?

Friday, November 13, 2015

8:00 – 8:45 Coal Harbour Ballroom Foyer

Morning Coffee

8:45 – 8:55 Coal Harbour Ballroom Foyer

Call to Conference

8:55 – 9:40 Coal Harbour Ballroom

Keynote Address

In 2014, former Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador Clyde Wells chaired an independent expert panel charged with reviewing the province’s freedom of information and privacy laws. Their final report resulted in ground-breaking legal reforms to the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act. The Newfoundland law is considered to be the most progressive privacy and access to information legislation in Canada.

Drawing from his political
 and legal career, his contributions as a distinguished jurist, and his most recent role as chair of the independent review of ATIPPA, Mr. Wells’ keynote will discuss the role of policy makers, information and privacy commissioners, and government in making information rights work for citizens and in the public interest. His presentation will provide practical solutions and demonstrate lessons other jurisdictions can learn from Newfoundland and Labrador.

9:40 –10:50 Coal Harbour Ballroom

Plenary Panel Session: Robotics and Privacy

The robots are coming. We already rely on machines to crawl the web, answer our questions, and help us navigate our world. More and more, these machines are being clothed in human qualities. The aim is to build trust and create the conditions for increased sharing of personal information, which can be mined for predictive analytics and other purposes. The decision to populate our skies, cities, workplaces, homes and families with machines that can sense, think and act on their own will cause profound social and economic shifts. It will increase surveillance in places we consider private. It will alter the role of human workers in a variety of sectors, beyond expected job losses. It will reconfigure our liability and accountability systems. How do our privacy laws map against this emerging robotic world? Will the public embrace these technologies, and if they do, will we recognize the risks?

10:50 – 11:10 Coal Harbour Ballroom Foyer

Morning Break

11:10 – 11:40 Coal Harbour A Presentation Files Daniel Pradelles

Concurrent Keynote Address: Global Privacy protection, fluid borderless data flows while supporting new technologies and advanced analytics..….Impossible Mission or Major Paradigm shift required?

The rapid expansion and pervasiveness of advanced technologies, coupled with the explosion of social networking platforms and behavioral-based business models, are attracting renewed policy attention, particularly with respect to privacy and data protection, consumer information stored in the cloud, use of information analytics, and cyber security. Hewlett Packard Enterprise encourages privacy and data protection regulations that afford a high level of protection, while supporting global business innovation and creative technologies, which need the critical ability to move, and access information across borders.

Most of the current approaches, on both regulatory and business sides, are based on concepts and vision as old as the early developments of Personal Data Protection / Privacy. Consequently achieving at same time robust Privacy protection; supporting efficient business models, rolling out new technologies; maximizing benefits for citizens, business and society as a whole… is often perceived as an Impossible Mission Force task….

Therefore a major paradigm shift based on new concepts and renewed dialog between all parties involved is paramount. One of the most promising concepts is the so called Accountability which is not totally new, nevertheless, its definition and implementation have been developed, over the last 6 years, in great detail by several think tanks and implemented by major companies like Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

The session will highlight the rationale of accountability, its definition as seen by a major multinational, and the benefits for both regulators and companies willing to implement a robust and efficient privacy program while using state of the art technologies, advanced business models and powerful data analytics practices. This will end with practical examples of the way this concept has been brought to practice in the company.

Presentation Files Daniel Pradelles

11:10 – 11:40 Coal Harbour B

Concurrent Keynote Address: Seeing Through the Cloud: Why National Jurisdiction and Location Still Matter

Moving to the Cloud? Many Canadian organizations are doing so, contracting with third party vendors to provide a wide range of digital services over the global internet. Concerns that extra-national outsourcing leaves Canadian data vulnerable to state surveillance in foreign jurisdictions have often been met by the “similar risk argument”: no matter where data is stored there is a similar risk of state surveillance, therefore location or jurisdiction does not matter. This talk questions the similar risk analysis and offers a view that location and national jurisdiction still matter. These are the findings of a recent research study by University of Toronto researchers Lisa Austin, Andrew Clement, Heidi Bohaker and Stephanie Perrin, which examined the privacy implications of extra-national outsourcing.

11:40 – 12:50 Coal Harbour A

Concurrent Panel Session A: Youth, Privacy and Cyberbullying

The suicides of two young Canadian women have sparked a national conversation about cyberbullying and a call to action. Cyberbullying is multifaceted – engaging education, criminal justice, social media, and the complex web of youth relationships. How can we effectively address cyberbullying and other online threats while respecting children’s rights, including the right to privacy?

11:40 – 12:50 Coal Harbour B

Concurrent Panel Session B: Political Parties, Privacy, and Digital Engagement in the 2015 Canadian Federal Election

Canadian political parties are using sophisticated digital and social media strategies and to engage and identify voters in the 2015 federal election. After the ballots are counted and the winner declared, this panel will reflect on digital engagement in the federal campaign, including: how and why Canadians “liked” and “followed” politicians’ online, how political parties used social platforms to collect and analyze data about voters and voting intentions, and the privacy implications of these activities.

12:50 – 1:50 Coal Harbour Ballroom

Networking Luncheon - Sponsored by Google

1:50 – 2:35 Coal Harbour Ballroom Presentation Files Cindy Compert

Keynote Address: From No to Know- Privacy, Meet Innovation

In this session, we'll discuss recent computing innovations such as Cloud, Mobile, Big Data, and Cognitive computing, how these new computing models change the world of privacy, and what we can do to realize the potential of this shift while protecting privacy. Although we can solve more complex problems and solve problems never before possible, this causes a challenge with collecting more types of sensitive data and combining data that could be risky and uncover privacy vulnerabilities. How do we strike a balance between innovation and privacy, so we can get from No to Know? Solve compelling problems such as diseases, safety, protecting the environment, etc., while protecting individual privacy? Provide new services for consumers and constituents alike? Join us for an informative and inspiring keynote and learn how you can achieve the art of the possible.

Presentation Files Cindy Compert

2:35 – 2:55 Coal Harbour Ballroom Foyer

Afternoon Break

2:55 – 4:10 Coal Harbour A Presentation Files Chantal Bernier

Concurrent Panel Session A: Data Localization and Data Sovereignty

In a world where data knows no borders, data localization laws – laws that restrict access and storage of personal information within jurisdictional and geographic limits – are the topic of heated debate. Some experts criticize localization requirements, saying they hamper innovation and put an unfair burden on companies and public bodies. . Others contend the laws are needed now more than ever to protect citizens’ sensitive personal information from the reach of foreign laws.. Are restrictions on the flow of personal data the way of the past? What are companies and public bodies doing to assure the public that their information is properly protected in the face of global data flows?

Presentation Files Chantal Bernier

2:55 – 4:10 Coal Harbour B

Concurrent Panel Session B: Wearables

Move over smart phones. Wearables – clothing and accessories that incorporate advanced electronic technology – are at the height of fashion for fitness, health care, and at work. As adoption rates explode among consumers and enterprise, how do we manage the privacy and data of those who use the devices?

4:10 – 5:00 Coal Harbour Ballroom

Closing Plenary Panel: The Future of Privacy

Break out the crystal ball -- this session will tie-up key themes from the conference in an interactive session casting forward to the future. How can we predict, and respond to, the opportunities and challenges for privacy and access to information that are emerging on the horizon? Come to hear the perspective of leading thinkers in data protection representing academics, regulators, and industry.

5:00 – 5:10

Closing Remarks

Title Sponsor

Platinum Sponsors

Gold Sponsor

Silver Sponsors

Lunch Sponsors

Conference Partners

Academic Partners

Coast Coal Harbour Hotel

The Coast Coal Harbour Hotel is situated right near the water, a stone’s throw from the beautiful Stanley Park as well as the bustling Gastown district and the renowned shopping on Robson St. and within easy access to an incredible array of arts and entertainment. We’re also steps from the Vancouver Convention Centre ideal for our business travelers.

Each of the guest rooms at our  downtown Vancouver hotel features floor-to-ceiling windows and sleek, yet comfortable, décor. Our rooms come with complimentary wireless Internet and a range of modern amenities. You’ll also have access to our top-notch fitness center, pool and hot tub—not to mention our signature Prestons Restaurant, the perfect spot to drink, dine and dish about your Vancouver experience.

The Coast Coal Harbour Hotel is offering a special conference rate of $129/night for conference delegates. To book a room online please go to:

https://resweb.passkey.com/Resweb.do?mode=welcome_ei_new&eventID=13943916

If booking a room by phone please quote the group code “CCC-GFC4648”. Please note that this room block ends October 18, 2015.

Contact Information for the Coast Coal Harbour Hotel:

Reservations: 1-800-663-1144
1180 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC V6E 4R5
Canada

http://www.coasthotels.com/hotels/bc/vancouver/coast-coal-harbour-hotel/